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i'm sloane & i like to look at things and read things and go places that may or may not exist.

i also
i l l u s t r a t e
and
d r a w c o m i c s
and
w r i t e


11:26 pm  17 notes

The Mourning Forest (2007) Dir. Naomi Kawase 

(Source: filmcat, via filmcat)

1:55 am  1,037 notes

Robert Altman: It’s true that I dreamed [3 Women], but it was not the content of the film or any emotion in it, just that it was about personality theft. I had a film cancelled on me at Warner Brothers. I needed to make a film badly, and then my wife Kathryn got very sick. We took her to the emergency hospital at four in the morning, and it seemed very serious at the time, though it all turned out fine in the end. But I returned to my house on the beach in Malibu and went to bed feeling kind of desperate, and I dreamed I was making this film. I dreamed the title, the location and that there were three women, and I knew two of the cast, Shelley Duvall and Sissy Spacek. Part of the dream was that I kept waking up and writing these things down on a notepad. And then I told two of my production people, Tommy Thompson and Bob Eggenweiler, to check out Palm Springs. When I really woke up, there was sand in the bed, because my son Matthew, who was eleven then, had joined me, and he was spending all of his time on the beach. So that’s probably where the desert location came from… I had no story at that point, just the ambience and an atmosphere.

Sissy Spacek: I remember he told us about his dream. I did little drawings, little sketches about his dream. Bob would get the seed of an idea and he would let the people he was working with become a part of that… He told me everything he knew about my character, Pinky, and then it was like he would give actors a track, a blueprint. ‘Now work within these parameters and put yourself into it.’ He didn’t need to have all the answers. He didn’t have that disease where as a director you have to know everything. There was a lot of improvisational stuff. He would give us a scene in the morning and then it would grow. It was so freeing working with him after having worked with other directors. The way he works is all very naturalistic. Everything is natural and the sets are happy and relaxed and he seemed to always be the happiest and the most relaxed. I don’t think I ever knew what the film was about. I remember Bob would say, ‘Well, if you confuse people enough in the first twenty minutes they’ll give up trying to figure out what it’s about and they’ll just go with it and enjoy it.’

Shelley Duvall: I wrote all my own monologues. Bob would say, ‘Why don’t you write a monologue just in case we can use it?’ And we’d use it. He knows I always do my homework. I had been reading Apartment Life, Redbook, Readers Digest, and Woman’s Day. It’s easy to write. Monologues just came out in 15 minutes. Well, I put a lot of myself in, but I’m not a consumer like Millie. I played her like a Lubitsch comedy—people taking themselves very seriously. It is great fun to watch, as long as it isn’t you.

(Source: strangewood, via clairedenis)

11:06 pm  25 notes

The Eve Of Ivan Kupalo

dir. Yuri Ilyenko (1968)

11:05 pm  66 notes

The Eve Of Ivan Kupalo

dir. Yuri Ilyenko (1968)

12:34 am  103 notes

peggypepper:

The Ballad of Narayama (1958)

Look outside, Father, the trees are all bare of leaves. Carry a wooden frame on your back. It’s time for you to go.

misterbadger:

A panel from a Keizo Miyanishi story in Lyrica.

10:17 pm  134 notes

misterbadger:

A panel from a Keizo Miyanishi story in Lyrica.

3:17 pm  229 notes

scrambledcreatures:

What Time Is It There? (2001) Tsai Ming-Liang

(Source: parklfe, via mizoguchi)

conscientiouspragmatist:

By Seiichi Hayashi (林静一). 

12:07 am  825 notes

conscientiouspragmatist:

By Seiichi Hayashi (林静一). 

(Source: libulan, via an-terranigma)

1910-again:

Józef Chełmoński, Study for Capercaillie 1890

5:31 pm  652 notes

1910-again:

Józef Chełmoński, Study for Capercaillie 1890

(via hchomgoblin)

convolucion:

Un Prophète (2009) , Jacques Audiard

5:35 pm  191 notes

convolucion:

Un Prophète (2009) , Jacques Audiard

2:18 pm  44 notes

marzipandildo:

Turumba [Kidlat Tahimik, 1981]

(via secondtimevirgin)

8:43 pm  845 notes

Shuna no Tabi (The Journey of Shuna) by Hayao Miyazaki

(Source: owlisonchin, via mrfb)

11:03 am  47 notes

secondtimevirgin:

The Dove’s Lost Necklace (Nacer Khemir, 1991)

(via mizoguchi)

“The effect of the cultural bomb is to annihilate a people’s belief in their names, in their languages, in their environment, in their heritage of struggle, in their unity, in their capacities and ultimately in themselves. It makes them see their past as one wasteland of non-achievement and it makes them want to distance themselves from that wasteland. It makes them want to identify with that which is furthest removed from themselves; for instance, with other peoples’ languages rather than their own. It makes them identify with that which is decadent and reactionary, all those forces that would stop their own springs of life. It even plants serious doubts about the moral righteousness of struggle. Possibilities of triumph or victory are seen as remote, ridiculous dreams. The intended results are despair, despondency and a collective death-wish.”

Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Decolonising the Mind (via daughterofzami)

(via mizoguchi)

11:01 am  284 notes

7:20 pm  3,612 notes

arecomicsevengood:

davezissou:

Kerascoët’s covers for Beauté with scans of the original art for the 2nd and 3rd tomes and the cover design for the first.

I think Kerascoët’s use of green ink is very interesting as a way to define lines and spaces meant for color while maintaining information within the image that black ink would otherwise compromise. It’s a smart method with using green to define the sky against the cloud and especially with the amount of creatures drawn heavily with black, the green prevents her from losing the shapes and figures to black and also from committing the all too common aural line around figure that would completely destroy the eerie mood of the third cover or the delicate detail of the comb going through black hair in the second.

This book looks great. Please come to America. I don’t care if it’s translated or not.

This book is coming out from NBM this Fall. All three books in one oversized volume, coming out around the same time as a larger collection of Miss Don’t Touch Me. It’s called “Beauty.”

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